Nyman’s piano

{mosimage}The
legendary English composer Michael Nyman visited Estonia in order to
give two memorable concerts in the capital, Tallinn. The first one
took place in an outstanding scenario: Kaarli Church, which was
literally overcrowded by the fans.

 

 

Born
in London in 1944, Michael Nyman has gained, not without reason, the
fame of being one of the best films music composers of the last
decades. He has collaborated with directors such as
Neil
Jordan
, Michael
Winterbottom
, Jane
Campion
or Laurence
Dunmore
and other well known musicians
as
Damon Albarn
(the ex member of
Blur),
having composed together the music for Ravenouz (1999). Nyman has
scored soundtracks for many other films like
Wonderland
(1999),
Gattaca (1997),
The Libertine
(2005),
The End of the Affair
(1999) and the one that launched him to a worldwide fame status: the
extremely beautiful compositions of
The
Piano
(1993).

 

The
composer and musician
visited Tallinn
invited by the
Black Nights Film
Festival
to perform in the opening
ceremony, but before, there was a special present: together with his
band, he offered a concert in Kaarli Church, one of the biggest and
most beautiful churches of the many that you can find spread around
the Estonian capital. Nyman did not show the exquisite punctuality
that you could look forward in an English gentleman, but even though,
it was worthy to wait a few minutes for the concert to get started.

 

Surrounded by high class professional musicians that form part of The
Michael Nyman Band
, Nyman seemed to be
happy with the close contact with the fans in the Estonian church,
and the band accomplished a musical tour around the best film
compositions scored by the Englishman during the past years. A
selection of themes from the
Draughtsman’s
Contract
were the first to be featured,
followed by others from
Wonderland
(special mention to the beautiful song
Molly),
Prospero’s Books
with another marvellous song:
Miranda,
and the most awaited moment of the night: Nyman’s solo performances
of The Piano; only three songs of the soundtrack, but enough to get
goose pimples while listening to the notes of
The
Heart Asks Pleasure First
; a romantic
and emotive moment that was followed by the final themes from
Drowning by Numbers.

 

The
audience wanted more and more, and not only obliged the band to
perform the compulsory encore, but even Nyman alone had to appear for
second time to dedicate a short
piano solo
to the fans that were feeling reluctant to leave such a magical
venue. An excellent gift for the ears.