Smart People

{mosimage}Dennis Quaid is a University professor with a mess of a life, though brilliant, unable to connect with the students, and unable to communicate with his family.

 

Smart acting for a smart movie. I had no idea about what I could expect with this one, and I had a good time watching it. The strongest point is the acting of the main cast: we have a re-born Dennis Quaid better than ever as a grumpy University professor stuck in the past after widowing; we even have a decent Sarah Jessica Parker as a physician who will bring some light into Professor Wherterhold´s life, but overall we have a collection of great scenes by Ellen Page and Thomas Haden Church; their twisted relation and their sharp and sarcastic comments are kind of the best of the whole movie.

 

Digging up the family relations of a family full of talented members, director Noam Murro makes a very decent debut with a story that, although a bit predictable at some moments, will leave a good taste in your mouth.

 

Rating 4/5

 

{mosimage}The best: Page and Haden Church getting drunk together at a bar

 

The worst: Ashton Homes character is wasted and could have added much more to the movie.

 

The detail: The character of Ellen Page is 17 in the film. Although looking pretty young, her real age is almost 22.